Friday, October 28, 2011

Blogtoberfest Day 28: Patterning My Dreams





Many vintage sewing patterns that I find while thrifting are uncut, supporting my belief that dreaming about making certain garments is as important as making them. Some of my earliest memories are of sitting at the pattern catalogue counter turning the pages and dreaming about the dresses. Playing dress-up was a favourite occupation and this was just a mental extension of that activity. Other sewers must also feel this way, that possessing the actual pattern is a way to grab onto that dream just a little more securely, with the expectation of it being attainable. The pattern for the dress and coat combination pictured is cut, but the sew-in label that was available with the pattern was not used. I love the seaming details and would like to make it but that would require grading up the pattern size.


This outfit also suits my tastes and is fairly close to my size. As usual, I am a sucker for a jacket especially if it has three-quarter sleeves! The notched collar on the jacket would make a perfect spot for a standout vintage brooch. A brocade, lace, linen or raw silk are all fabric suggestions on the back that fire my imagination.









I cannot decide which view I like the best of this Vogue "young fashionables" design, styled for the young woman who emulates an older woman's elegance. This is somewhat the opposite of current trend of middle-aged women seeking to be fashionable often choosing styles that, at best, erode their elegance.
While in high school, I longed for the time when I could make and wear couture-inspired suits and gowns. This style features darting from hip to bust which was a common detail for fitting a figure before the prevalence of lycra.







The controlled fullness of the skirt would be easier to wear than the above sheath. Although it has bridal and bridesmaid's view, this pattern is also suggested as an evening or cocktail gown. The simplicity of the figure-flattering bodice, self-fabric belt and softly pleated skirt would showcase the beauty of the fabric without overwhelming the wearer.


This apron pattern from the 1940's would be a good place to start turning these pattern dreams into realty, the charm of a vintage design with the practicality of full coverage. It only requires 2 yards and I am sure that I have some great rick-rack for the trim.


Which designs are your favourites? These come from my collection of vintage patterns. I have more than a few collections that I have linked with Vintage Velda's collections post.

6 comments:

gardener-b said...

Love your vintage patterns. Until now I was feeling guilty about all the unused patterns I have but you have made me now see them as fuel for my dreams. Thanks.

Helen and her Daughters said...

I collect vintage patterns too, these are lovely!

vintagevelda said...

Your "Blogtoberfest" has been so fun! I love the vintage patterns--reminds me of my mom and grandma and all the lovely things they use to sew.

Protector of Vintage said...

Love your patterns. I collect them, too, but don't come across too many while out thrifting. Have a great day!

Rhyan said...

I love your patterns. I am actually going to make a vintage cocktail apron for a cousin for Christmas. I am going to have to learn to take a pattern down. I cant take a patter up a size or two. there are just not patterns for someone that small. I have come to realize its all in the material I choose to use.

Rhyan said...

I love your patterns. I am actually going to make a vintage cocktail apron for a cousin for Christmas. I am going to have to learn to take a pattern down. I cant take a patter up a size or two. there are just not patterns for someone that small. I have come to realize its all in the material I choose to use.